Thursday, December 19, 2013

Who can I invite to join us this Christmas?

A friend posted the following on his Facebook page:

"At the request of a friend...Sobering thoughts as we enter the holiday season...It is important to remember that not everyone is surrounded by large wonderful families. Some of us have problems during the holidays and sometimes are overcome with great sadness when we remember the loved ones who are not with us. And, many people have no one to spend these times with and are besieged by loneliness. We all need caring, loving thoughts right now. If I don't see your name, I'll understand. May I ask my friend(s)...... Wherever you might be, to kindly copy, paste, and share this status for one hour to give a moment of support to all those who have family problems, health struggles, job issues, worries of any kind and just need to know that someone cares. Do it for all of us, for nobody is immune. I hope to see this on the walls of all my friends just for moral support. I know some will! I did it for a friend and you can too! (You have to copy & paste this one, .....NO 'sharing' please"

Funny, this has on my mind for the past few days, but I didn't know how to say it.  I hope the original author doesn't mind me borrowing it because I need it to help me put my priorities and perceived "struggles" in their place.  

If I hadn't read this post

  • I might have been tempted to shamefully blog about my large family's unbelievably insane attempt to get the entire family together in one place at one time. 


  • I would have droned on and on about my iCal exploding and the headaches of keeping up with whom I will see when and where. 

But if I had, all of you would have shouted together as one, "Boo! Hoo!" and "Shame on  you!"

And I would have deserved it.

Thank heavens, the Facebook post instead reminded me of how my grandparents did Christmas.

My grandparents'  home was always open to strangers who found themselves away from family or alone during the holidays. Soldiers passing through town on their way to somewhere else were often at the family Christmas dinner table.

Matter of fact, Norman, a young soldier from Pennsylvania enjoyed Christmas at my grandparent's home so much, he ended up marrying their oldest child, my aunt Mary Alice.  (The real story is he fell in love with her AT the dinner table and phoned his parents to announce he'd found his future bride!)

It is a sweet story and even sweeter because it reminds me of my uncle who used to tell it. (Sadly, he passed away this year.)

It also reminds me to quit making sure I make it to all my little event and instead think…

 Who can I invite to join us this Christmas?  

Go Ahead - Google it!